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Placer claim information, Geneology research
Randysgirl
post Jul 12 2016, 02:42 PM
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I'm looking for information on an ancestor who lived/mined in Colorado, and have possibly located record of placer claims in his name, but I don't want to order them from the archives if they won't have any helpful information for my research, so I was wondering if anyone could tell me what information appeared on those claims circa 1894. Names of course, but any info about where the person making the claim was from? Where they currently resided? I have no interest in the claims themselves, just looking for information about him as a person to add to the family tree.
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EMac
post Jul 12 2016, 03:23 PM
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I haven't seen many of these, but here's a location certificate from 1892:

BlongerBros website


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EMac
post Jul 12 2016, 03:53 PM
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Since that was a lode certificate, here is a placer one:

Northern Arizona University


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Gene Kooper
post Jul 12 2016, 05:06 PM
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I have compiled a list of claimants for approved Colorado mineral surveys. The information may not include your ancestor as the claimant listed on the plat and field notes may be John Doe, et al. with your ancestor being one of "the others". The official records such as the plat, field notes and patent do not include the information you are interested in obtaining. The National Archives in D.C. has the land entry case files for patented placer claims. The cost is $50 per file. If the placer claims were not patented, then there won't be a land entry case file (it is sometimes called the patent application package).

The documents in the land entry case file may provide some information you are interested in, but other sources like Census and immigration records may be cheaper to obtain. Since your research is not about what land he owned or where it is located, obtaining the land entry case files may be an expensive undertaking with little or no unique information.

I checked the information in a land entry case file from 1887 and found three documents that listed the address of the claimant. The first document had no title, the second was a "Receiver's Receipt" that listed the address where the patent was to be sent, and the third one was the most informative for your purposes. Before obtaining a patent for mineral lands, the claimant must file a "Proof of Citizenship". My example includes the claimant's date and place of birth, his current residence, the place and date of naturalization, and a declaration that he has been a constant resident of the United States. In my example, the claimant had an agent with power of attorney to file and sign the necessary papers since the claimant lived in New York City.
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Denise
post Jul 13 2016, 08:04 AM
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Great info Gene and hopefully it helps her with her searching! Good luck Randysgirl and hopefully you can be adding him to the family tree soon! thumbsupsmileyanim.gif


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EMac
post Jul 13 2016, 09:33 AM
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I love the knowledge I gain here! Thanks Gene!


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Randysgirl
post Jul 13 2016, 07:27 PM
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QUOTE (Gene Kooper @ Jul 12 2016, 06:06 PM) *
I have compiled a list of claimants for approved Colorado mineral surveys. The information may not include your ancestor as the claimant listed on the plat and field notes may be John Doe, et al. with your ancestor being one of "the others". The official records such as the plat, field notes and patent do not include the information you are interested in obtaining. The National Archives in D.C. has the land entry case files for patented placer claims. The cost is $50 per file. If the placer claims were not patented, then there won't be a land entry case file (it is sometimes called the patent application package).

The documents in the land entry case file may provide some information you are interested in, but other sources like Census and immigration records may be cheaper to obtain. Since your research is not about what land he owned or where it is located, obtaining the land entry case files may be an expensive undertaking with little or no unique information.

I checked the information in a land entry case file from 1887 and found three documents that listed the address of the claimant. The first document had no title, the second was a "Receiver's Receipt" that listed the address where the patent was to be sent, and the third one was the most informative for your purposes. Before obtaining a patent for mineral lands, the claimant must file a "Proof of Citizenship". My example includes the claimant's date and place of birth, his current residence, the place and date of naturalization, and a declaration that he has been a constant resident of the United States. In my example, the claimant had an agent with power of attorney to file and sign the necessary papers since the claimant lived in New York City.


[b] Thank you so much for your detailed reply -- saved me time (and money!). I'm glad I found the site as well. I may not learn specifics about my ancestor, but may get a feel for the time and place he lived. Thanks again!
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Randysgirl
post Jul 13 2016, 07:29 PM
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Thank you to all of you who replied to this post! My search regarding my ancestor will continue, since he's my only "dead end", and I appreciate not having to spend time and money pursuing a blind path.
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